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Pethealth is partly sponsored by Ceva Animal Health

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The worst pet behaviours of 2102 finally revealed!

Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 7:38:45 PM EST by Cam Day
Hello Colleague,

The worst pet behaviours of 2102 finally revealed!Escaping dogs are a welfare concern

Perhaps that headline is a bit overcooked but I always find it's interesting doing a year's end analysis of the behaviour problems pet owners want remedied.

So, I have just done the evil behaviour list for 2012 and 'the secret never-before-revealed results are now released'.

The evil list should be of i
nterest to you because most of these cases are those referred to us by Veterinarians.

That means this 'bad behaviour' list shows the behaviour cases that worry you the most as well.

It's not astounding that aggressive dogs and cats are the most common behaviour we deal with.

However, I note the proportion of aggressive dogs is increasing each year. Over the last few years that percentage has increased from 38% to almost 45%.

Excess vocalisation is the second most common behaviour but at 16% of cases, it's a distant second from aggression.

Separation related behaviours come in at third place.

As always there are two behaviour clusters that worry cat owners - aggression and soiling. And those two behaviour clusters represent 70% of the owner's temper turmoils.

I always say that if you want to become a Veterinary Behaviourist, start with cats because you only have to become an expert in two behaviour clusters to cater for the needs of 70% of your cat-owning clientele.

The data is summarised in the tables below.

Some questions that are always asked about this data:-


Q. Where do we get this data? Click to access Pethealth.com.au

A.  Pet owners complete our Behaviour Assessment form (click here) and pick their m
ost significant worry from a drop-down list.

Q. Are the behaviours listed a true diagnosis?


A. No they are not. They are only what the client chooses to select as their first priority behaviour to be resolved. Diagnosis is part of the assessment that happens when a pet owner books a consultation. The therapy then kicks in as the second step of the process and the follow-up phase is the third step which ensures the diagnosis, assessment and therapy are being effective.

Q. But aggressive dogs also bark or may be anxious so how relevant is this data?

A. That's an important observation. The very nature of behaviour is that there is almost always an overlap between behaviour clusters. Dogs with separation anxiety vocalise. Dogs which are aggressive vocalise and dogs which escape often have noise phobias or separation anxiety.

 
Table 1
Dog Behaviour Submissions 2012
 
Behaviour cluster
 
Number of cases
 
%
 
Aggression
438
44.79%
 
Barking
160
16.36%
 
Separation anxiety
145
14.83%
 
Destructive
45
4.60%
 
Noise phobia
45
4.60%
 
Boisterous
28
2.86%
 
Pheromone inquiry
25
2.56%
 
House soiling
24
2.45%
 
Fearful
20
2.04%
 
Anxious
19
1.94%
 
Escaping
12
1.23%
 
Attention seeking
6
0.61%
 
Pacing/tail chasing
6
0.61%
 
Assimilation
5
0.51%
 
 
 
 
TOTAL
 
978
 



 
Table 2
Cat Behaviour Submissions 2012
 
Behaviour cluster
 
Number of cases
 
%
 
Aggression
65
38.24%
 
House-soiling
55
32.35%
 
Fearful and anxious
9
5.29%
 
Pheromone inquiry
9
5.29%
 
Destructive chewing
5
2.94%
 
Escaping
5
2.94%
 
Attention seeking
4
2.35%
 
Vocalising/meowing
4
2.35%
 
Assimilation
3
1.76%
 
Boisterous
3
1.76%
 
Over-grooming
3
1.76%
 
Separation anxiety
3
1.76%
 
Anxious
2
1.18%
 
 
 



Cheers and keep misbehaving.

 

Dr Cam Day BVSc BSc MACVS (Animal Behaviour)

Pethealth is partly sponsored by Ceva Animal Health

Thanks go to Ceva Animal Health for providing partial funding for this project.


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What do Vets need to do better behaviour managment?

Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2012 at 12:07:05 PM EST by Cam Day

Vetbehaviourist.com.au

Online resources to help clinical veterinarians easily provide a high quality pet behaviour management service.


Hello Colleague,

Do you agree that fixing broken bones is easy but fixing broken brains is not

Click here to leave comments

Vetbehaviourist

 

Click here to tell us what you need to fix broken brains

The more I speak to vets and nurses about behaviour cases, the more I realise that vets don’t have the resources they need to make behaviour cases easier.

But most vets and nurses have a passion for behaviour and would like to do more work in the area.

We can help with that and the purpose of this email is to introduce you to the Veterinary Behaviourist Project.

Fixing broken bones is easier because you can see the fracture and can plan the cure easily.

You can’t see where a brain is broken which means pet behaviour therapy is a very intuitive science.

And it’s so time consuming - but fun all the same.

The Veterinary Behaviourist Project will be launched soon but you can express your interest in that now by letting me know what resources you would like to have available.

I will then see what I can do to provide them.

Here’s a simple overview of the Project:-

Overview

The Veterinary Behaviourist Project is one of three projects that exists within the PETHEALTH Project.

Its goal is to provide online, science-based solutions for pet behaviour management to the Veterinary profession.

It will achieve this by focussing on two critical elements:-

  1. That veterinarians will benefit from resources that will help them assess, diagnose and treat behaviour cases.
  2. That veterinarians need a business model that will enable them to profit from behaviour cases

I will be honest – the reason I can produce the Veterinary Behaviourist Project is because it combines two of my passions.

The first is a passion for the science of pet behaviour management.

But the second is an equal passion I have for technology and web-based widgets that provide for online education to just about anyone. Nowadays, that can happen on most technology platforms including PCs, iThings and Androids.

Enough for now!  The mangled minds of mayhem-making mutts and man-eating moggies beckons my call so we will talk again soon.

Please let me know your thoughts and I will get the ball rolling.

Click here to tell us what you need to fix broken brains

Cheers

 

Dr Cam Day BVSc BSc MACVS (Animal Behaviour)

 cevalogo

Thanks goes to Ceva Animal Health for joining with this project and for providing partial funding.

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